Faceting is not as popular a term as polishing, especially among diamond cutters. Faceting can also refer to soft- stone cutting, where it is a far different process on a much smaller scale. A diamond cutting bench must be very heavy in order to ensure very little vibration, resulting in finer facet edges and higher polishes. Typically a lap for colored stones might weigh twenty to fifty pounds, whereas a diamond cutting bench can weigh three hundred to five hundred pounds. Unlike diamond cutting, on a soft stone, the cutting direction across the wheel will not affect the speed of material being removed (for the most part). Polishing larger, more valuable diamonds takes a precise knowledge of the grain direction in the piece of rough (or recut) that’s being worked on. The cutter must take account of the twelve grains that travel through a stone in different directions, to make his job more efficient. By being aware of the precise direction of the particular grain he is working off, not only does it speed up the removal of material, but it also obtains a higher polish in the final step.